Book Review; Soulless (Parasol Protectorate, #1)

First, she has no soul. Second, she’s a spinster whose father is both Italian and dead. Third, she was rudely attacked by a vampire, breaking all standards of social etiquette.

Where to go from there? From bad to worse apparently, for Alexia accidentally kills the vampire – and then the appalling Lord Maccon (loud, messy, gorgeous, and werewolf) is sent by Queen Victoria to investigate.

With unexpected vampires appearing and expected vampires disappearing, everyone seems to believe Alexia responsible. Can she figure out what is actually happening to London’s high society? Will her soulless ability to negate supernatural powers prove useful or just plain embarrassing? Finally, who is the real enemy, and do they have treacle tart?

~~~~~

soullessOne of the first things I noticed when reading was the style of writing. I assumed the author wrote her book in the same way of other books written during the Victorian era. I’ve read several classics, including Dracula, several Jane Austen, and Anne Radcliff, so I am familiar with the overly descriptive prose. It gives the book an overall Victorian tone. What I wasn’t expecting was the constant POV shift between characters, and right in the middle of a scene. Very confusing.

My second observation was that for it being a Steampunk novel, there wasn’t much in the way of technology. This was not a problem to me. Each writer has a different idea of what is required, technology-wise, and I was glad to see a bit more towards the end. There are a few ‘steamy’ scenes in the book, but nothing that could be considered erotic.

This book was recommended to me by several friends when they heard I was interested in reading Steampunk. I felt it dragged a bit, and there were a few places that I skimmed through, but overall it was an enjoyable read. There are more books in the series, but I’m not sure if I’ll read them or not.

 

3 out of 5

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